Wisdom of Words

People will tell you some things are impossible

Climber

Trust their advice. Wishful thinking doesn’t change reality.


Follow your heart

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after aligning it with socially acceptable, meaningful and achievable goals.


The rush of wind in your face

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is not worth the higher mortality risk of motorcycles.


Take life one day at a time

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as if you have any choice on the matter


Nothing is worse than not having friends

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with benefits.


Believe in yourself

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only as much as evidence dictates you should.


Teamwork

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is highly inefficient due to coordination, motivation and agency problems.


The best advice you’ll ever get

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will be from an internet listicle.

 

8 thoughts on “Wisdom of Words

  1. “As if you have any choice in the matter.”

    Everyone knows that the piece of advice is meant in the sense, “Think about today rather than spending your time imagining the future or obsessing about the past.” You do have a choice in this particular matter, and in fact people will generally be happier if they concentrate on the present, or if you must think about the past and the future, do it deliberately and in its specified time, rather than randomly throughout the day.

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  2. Aaaah! Some of these pieces of “wisdom” are right, some I disagree with and others seem to be jokes.

    >People will tell you some things are impossible
    >Trust their advice. Wishful thinking doesn’t change reality.

    >Believe in yourself
    >only as much as evidence dictates you should.

    People can’t really hack their System 1 to believe things exactly as much as evidence dictate they should. I think believing in yourself
    and your ability to do things that are considered impossible by many is useful. It lets you try and maybe do those great things, and
    believing in yourself is socially beneficial, because people like those who are confident and believe in themselves.
    Related reading:
    http://waitbutwhy.com/2015/11/the-cook-and-the-chef-musks-secret-sauce.html
    http://lesswrong.com/lw/jhs/dark_arts_of_rationality/ (See the section about compartmentalization “I can do anything”)

    >The best advice you’ll ever get
    >will be from an internet listicle.
    This is either a joke or something I disagree with

    >Teamwork
    >is highly inefficient due to coordination, motivation and agency problems.
    Probably a joke, but it’s not clear if it’s 100% joke or not 😦

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    1. “People can’t really hack their System 1 to believe things exactly as much as evidence dictate they should. I think believing in yourself
      and your ability to do things that are considered impossible by many is useful. It lets you try and maybe do those great things, and
      believing in yourself is socially beneficial, because people like those who are confident and believe in themselves.”

      I try the impossible on a regular basis, citation: I argue on the internet. As an example of internet arguing, I will nitpick this concept more then would seam indicated. When I was younger I would jump onto my bed and try to forget that I will hit the bed in an attempt to fly as described by the Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy. I never did so off the roof of my house. I haven’t tried to do this in quite a while.

      “believing in yourself and your ability to do things that are considered impossible by many is” useful dangerous sometimes useful, sometimes dangerous, and sometimes simply silly. It can sometimes result in great things but it can also result in wasted time (and/or other resources) or doing something horrible in your ill-advised attempt with a low chance of success. My attempt to create an energy efficient controlled fusion reactor in my garage leads could do any of these.

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  3. I almost complained about the lack of numbers in this post. Then I noticed that it does, in fact, have a number in it: “one”. This is aesthetically sufficient. Good job.

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